Step up and discern the difference.

320 King St E - 2nd Floor

KINTSUGI DRIPS

Kintsugi, also known as kintsukuroi, has become a powerful emblem, not for brokenness, but for wholeness despite the shockwaves in life. It is not about finding beauty in chaos or tragedy, it is a symbol - like the cross is to Christians - of faith and perseverance, of the belief that victory, success and wholeness are often realized through the challenges of life, if we rise to those challenges.

SACRO FIORE

Victor Oriecuia, a Kingston-based stone carver is passionate about his calling. With no rigid rules or expectations, he freely carves, both Italian and local Ontario marble, to evoke his senses and appease his passion. He utilizes the direct carving method, a method which requires no model or predetermined outcome…a method which relies heavily on faith.

FALL 2021: Artist Portfolio Series

Our Fall Artist Portfolio Series shows the most recent works by our regular artists. This grouping will be regularly updated to include the most recent additions to the gallery collection throughout the fall of 2021.

Featured Artists

Leah Hicks

Leah Hicks is a Smiths Falls, Ontario based abstract, acrylic and multimedia artist.

Teri Wing

I believe my interest in people started at a very young age, when I was told to sit still and quiet, which was usually at church or a waiting room. I would be handed a pen and old grocery list or envelope from Mums bag, I would draw other people also waiting.

Lee Stewart

Kingston-based artist, Lee Stewart was born and raised in Kashechewan, a small remote reserve on James Bay, Northern Ontario, spent years in the Rideau Lakes region, and studied art history at Carleton. Stewart’s cultural influences are as vast as his experience, without hierarchy or elevated status. As a self-taught artist, Stewart’s experimentation, innate curiosity, and openness continue to shape his evolving style.
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Newsroom

There are some artworks that grab you immediately when you first encounter them. There’s sometimes no rhyme or reason to it, and it might be something that is completely outside of what you think you normally like, but there it is – you’re smitten. By the same token, there is some artwork that you don’t think much of, at first glance anyway. But your eyes keep sliding back to it, again and again, though you’re not sure why. Intrigued, you return to the artwork to look at it more closely, to pay attention to it. These are the types of paintings (or other art objects) that you have to spend time with to fully appreciate, and they are often also the ones that are most worth the effort.
“We can find inspiration everywhere,” Nenkova said this week. “Living in Sudbury we are surrounded by stories of hardship, persistence and success, especially as they relate to mining. We need to remember that while most of us want to enjoy material things, such as cars, houses, or the latest iPhone, few of us appreciate the real price paid by the people who tirelessly worked underground to make these things possible.”