SOMETHING BIG

Ending the decade and kicking off 2020 in a BIG way! Have you spent the better part of 2019 staring at blank walls? Have you dreamed of finding a perfect one-of-a-kind signature piece for your home or office? 2019 has been a great year for Studio22.  We have had 8 successful solo shows as well as acquired a number of fabulous new artists. […]

Enigma Variations – JT Winik

Thematically, Winik’s new paintings are composed of two main series; Girl(s) in a Corner and Female Circus Performers. The first series depicts young women in party dresses, sitting alone in corners, confronting the viewer face on. The simplicity of the theme allows the artist’s process to focus solely on interacting with mark-making until a figure forms, each with its own personality and attitude. Sometimes these girls appear a bit broken, other times they challenge the viewer, but mostly there’s a bit of both. It is that merging of conflicting senses that keeps the audience intrigued – with strength and vulnerability co-habiting as they so often do in real life. 

Lee Stewart

Kingston-based artist, Lee Stewart was born and raised in Kashechewan, a small remote reserve on James Bay, Northern Ontario, spent years in the Rideau Lakes region, and studied art history at Carleton. Stewart’s cultural influences are as vast as his experience, without hierarchy or elevated status. As a self-taught artist, Stewart’s experimentation, innate curiosity, and openness continue to shape his evolving style.

Keight MacLean

Keight MacLean is a Toronto based painter, originally from the Kingston region, an alumna of OCAD University and the school’s prestigious Florence Program. Intrigued by our connection to the distant past and the historical treatment of women, MacLean’s work combines elements of Baroque and Renaissance painting with modern and experimental techniques.

COLOUR BLAST – Erika Olson

Erika Olson’s new solo exhibition features a return to the large colourful abstracts which marked the early days of her painting career.

REMNANTS – Debra Krakow

Krakow’s work reminds us that our subjective viewpoints necessarily reflect experience filtered through time and that which we most accurately perceive often demands focused attention and thoughtful exploration.

JT Winik

Kinston based painter JT Winik seeks to capture the fine balance that binds opposites. A keen observer, her paintings merge beauty and awkwardness, freedom and control, fragility and strength, often evoking a strong emotional sense of discomfort in their portrayal of beauty. Highly regarded, her paintings are shown in Canada and Europe, and featured in magazines, books and book covers, internationally.

Last Week of Current Exhibits

We are in the final few days of our current exhibit period.  Our featured exhibits, A Perfect Day – New Oils by Susan Oomen, Paintings by Robert Blenderman and Rebecca Cowan’s Julie Brown Project, have been accompanied by some terrific new work by Teresa Mrozicka, Debra Krakow, and introducing Isaac Gillis. Some of our Favourites […]

Paintings by Robert Blenderman

Blenderman’s tireless imagination is hardly exhausted by local streetscapes and landscapes. Realistic, classically styled still lives and wildly expressive abstracts have also been the subject of his attention over the years.

i Love THIS PIECE

Each work has been selected by the artist because it represents a piece which they feel deeply about; works which have yet to find their soulmates.

HORIZONS – New Works by Debra Krakow

All it takes is the subtlest hint of a horizon line for our minds to see landscape in an abstract painting. We’re drawn to wide-open spaces and expansive views, and landscape paintings connect us to these places. The concept of abstract landscape allows me incredible artistic freedom and yet grounds the work in visual experience. – Debra Krakow

Ulrich Panzer

Ulrich Panzer is a German artist who shares his time between Berlin and his studio in Glenburnie, Ontario. His paintings are inspired by his continuous interest in the synesthetic perception of sound and musical chords, by observations of light in nature and by the colours of minerals and seashells.